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A good officer’s Korea pair with Mention in Despatches to Lieutenant Leslie Cornick The King’s Regiment, attached to 1stBattalion, Royal Ulster Rifles.

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A good officer’s Korea pair with Mention in Despatches to Lieutenant Leslie Cornick The King’s Regiment, attached to 1stBattalion, Royal Ulster Rifles.

Korea (1sttype) Lt. LCornick. Kings; UN Korea, un-named as issued.

With named box of   issue for the Queen’s Korea medal and box of issue for the UN Korea medal.

Leslie Cornick was born in Ormskirk in 1927.  He was commissioned into the King’s Regiment as Second Lieutenant on 21 December 1946.  He was promoted Lieutenant on 21 December 1947.  He transferred to the Reserve of Officers on 1 January 1949.

Cornick was recalled from the Reserve for service during the Korean War.  He was attached to the Royal Ulster Rifles.

MID in London Gazette dated 30 November 1951 (p. 6252).

The award was for leading a patrol on the morning of 17 September 1951 while a platoon commander in D Company, 1stBattalion Royal Ulster Rifles:

On the morning of 17th[September 1951] a platoon of D Company, under Lieutenant Cornick, was detailed to occupy ‘How’ [a hill].  The men moved out of the company position at about 0400 hours and at dawn, as they were climbing the southern slope of the hill itself, came under heavy automatic fire at close range; the Chinese had beaten them to it and were already established on the crest.

The platoon withdrew to a small feature about 600 yards to the south, where they were ordered to stay and engage the enemy.  During the firing one man, Rifleman Turner, was hit and another man of the section, Rifleman Newport, very gallantly turned back in the face of very heavy fire and carried him down the hill to join the rest of the platoon.

The platoon remained in a position south of ‘How’ and kept the area under observation for the remainder of the day.  At about 1430 hours enemy mortar fire began to fall on the hill, indicating that the enemy were withdrawing.  At about the same time the Canadians, further east, reported seeing about 50 Chinese moving along the ridge immediately behind the hill and shelled them, inflicting several casualties.

Lieutenant Cornick’s platoon remained in their position until dusk and then withdrew to their company.’

From: The Royal Ulster Rifles in Korea, W. M. Wullan & Son (1953)

It appears that Cornick returned to the reserve of Officers after his service in Korea.

Medals VF, UN Koreal with original wearing pin.