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Officially impressed Crimea to the Famous I Troop Royal Horse Artillery, who accompanied the Light Brigade during their famous charge.

£1,375.00

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Officially impressed Crimea to the Famous I Troop Royal Horse Artillery, who accompanied the Light Brigade during their famous charge.

Crimea, clasps, Alma, Balaclava, Inkermann, Sebastopol, S. Huntley. Dr Rl Hse Arty. (Officially Impressed naming)

Service papers show Stephen Huntley served for 22 years, from January 1852. He was born in Ashford, Kent and enlisted aged 17. Served until 1875, leaving the Army stating his intended residence was Gravesend.

With copies of original medal rolls confirming all clasps.

“I” Troop fired the first shots of the Crimean war, to disperse Cossacks at the landing site in Kalamita Bay.

At the beginning of the action at Balaklava, “I” Troop under Capt. Maude was ordered forward to give supporting fire to artillery batteries under attack in the valley. They came into action on the Causeway Heights near No. 3 Redoubt and took a severe pounding from Russian gunners.

Captain Maude was severely wounded by an exploding shell at this stage and command devolved onto Capt. J. Shakespeare (who left a detailed account of what happened next).

Raglan’s famous order which launched “the Charge of the Light Brigade” included a reference to the fact that “Troop Horse Artillery may accompany”. This was “I” Troop, which went into action slightly behind and to the right of the charging light cavalry. However, they were halted during their own charge by difficult terrain over which it was impossible for the guns and limbers to pass, though they opened fire on the Russian positions to give some form of artillery support to the cavalry.

Lord Lucan gave the order for the troop to withdraw; “I” Troop had by this time expended all their immediately available ammunition.

Initially members of “I” Troop were admitted to the Balaklava Commemoration Society meetings as having particpated in the charge, but around 1878 the rules were altered and members of the RHA troop were not allowed to attend.

An interesting medal to a good artillery unit.

Condition – GVF, with the normal scratches knocks and wear you would expect from a man in the Horse Artillery.