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The exceptional and complete WWI Distinguished Flying Medal group of three and rare contemporary ink written Log Book to Sergeant Observer E. G. “Mad Monty” Maund, Royal Air Force, late Royal Naval Air Service and later Lieutenant, Royal Navy, who received the moniker “Mad Monty” for climbing out onto the wing of his DH4 aircraft during a raid on the seaplane base at Constantinople to ascertain his success in putting a bomb into each of the three aircraft hangars below him.

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The exceptional and complete WWI Distinguished Flying Medal group of three and rare contemporary ink written Log Book to Sergeant Observer E. G. “Mad Monty” Maund, Royal Air Force, late Royal Naval Air Service and later Lieutenant, Royal Navy, who received the moniker “Mad Monty” for climbing out onto the wing of his DH4 aircraft during a raid on the seaplane base at Constantinople to ascertain his success in putting a bomb into each of the three aircraft hangars below him.

Consists: Distinguished Flying Medal George V (224374 Sergt. Mech. Obs. Maund, E. G., R.A.F.), WWI War Medal (224374 Sgt. E. G. Maund, R.A.F.); Victory Medal (224374 Sgt. E. G. Maund, R.A.F.).

Accompanied by Log Book covering operational flying from 12 Nov 1917 to 19 Oct 1918 and a wealth of original material and photographs including portrait photograph of the recipient as an R.N.A.S. Petty Officer; photograph of the recipient taken in 1926 and a group photograph of Royal Flying Corps. airmen including the recipient; a ‘cut out’ (5″ x 4″) photograph as a Lieutenant in R.N.V.R. uniform (wearing his D.F.M. and pair ribbons) dated 1946; recipient’s personal pro-forma detailing career and marital status up to 1946; London Gazette extract announcing award of the D.F.M.; details of payment made for winning his D.F.M. (twenty pounds) and unclaimed leave allowance; forwarding slip for the DFM dated 20 November 1919 and addressed to the recipient at Sylvian Road, Ilford, Essex; Admiralty Identification card for Motor Drivers; Naval Identity card including photograph of the recipient (wearing his three ribbons) as a Sub Lieutenant, dated 7 April 1944; RAF Pass to be absent from quarters at Calshott, dated 30 August 1919; Ward Room Mess Bill for Royal Naval Air Station Eastleigh, addressed to Lieut. E. J. Maund; Certificate of Employment During the War, marked R.A.F. Station Calshot, dated 12 Nov 1919. Protection Certificate and Certificate of Identity.

Distinguished Flying Medal – London Gazette 1 Jan 1919.

224374 Serjt. Mech. (Obs.) Ernest George Maund (Ilford).

Ernest George Maund was born in Leytonstone, London, on 9th July 1898 and lived with his parents and brother at 54 Sylvan Road, Ilford, Essex, until his marriage in 1926. He joined the Royal Naval Air Service on 28 November, 1916, being appointed as AC 2 with the service number 224374.  His subsequent RNAS postings being as follows:

28.11.1916 – 27.12.1916 HMS President II; 28.12.1916 – 21.03.1917 HMS Gannet; 22.03.1917 – 30.03.1917          ??????; 31.03.1917 – 02.05.1917 HMS Excellent; promoted ACM1 30.04.1917; 03.05.1917 – 30.06.1917 HMS Eastchurch; 01.07.1917 – 14.09.1917 HMS Deadalus; 15.09.1917 – 31.03.1918 HMS President II; 01.04.1918 – Transferred to the newly formed Royal Air Force as Private 1; 02.04.1918 – Reclassified as Sergeant Mechanic. 01.01.1919 – Reclassified as Sergeant.

War Service (1914 – 1918).

Maund was posted from the Home establishment to No 2 Wing RNAS then serving in the Eastern Mediterranean.  No 2 Wing, known as the Aegean Group, flew land planes from aerodromes situated on various small islands in the Aegean Sea off the Turkish, Bulgarian and the Greek coasts. This often involved flying for long distances over the sea and rugged enemy held territory in Thrace and Macedonia, bombing strategic targets in the eastern Mediterranean. The problems of flying in this area were compounded by heat and dust which often meant overheated and clogged engines.

Maund, with various pilots, undertook bombing raids, operating from bases at Thasos, Imbros, and Mudros.

In January 1918 the SMS Goeben (now renamed Yavuz Sultan Selim) having made a foray out into the Mediterranean hit a mine and was continually harried by RNAS machines from nearby Imbros and Mudros which were only about five miles away which flew attack after attack. Both bombing runs and straffing with machine guns. Reports say that within ten minutes of being sited there were up to ten British machines harrying the ships.

For six days she was under attack by RNAS planes from Mudros and Imbros and even some RFC planes from Palestine. They were also joined by seaplanes from the Ark Royal and empress.

Flight Sub-Lieutenant Hook (pilot) and Sergeant Mechanic Observer E.G. Maund, bombed Yavuz Sultan Selim (SMS Goeben) on 3 consecutive days; 21, 22, 23 January 1918 flying D.H.4 – HF3009.

Defense of Yavuz Sultan Selim (SMS Goeben) January 20 – 26, 1918.

“After the Battle of Imbros, damaged & beached battlecruiser Yavuz came under Allied air attacks while protected by 6th Ottoman Aviation Company & German planes. She was finally towed to safety by Turgut Reis.”

Continuing to operate throughout January, February and March 1918, Maund transferred to the Royal Air Force on its formation in April 01, 1918, and continued serving in the Eastern Mediterranean.

He transferred to the Eastern Mediterranean Repair Base on September 18, 1918 and from that unit to 222 squadron on September 22, 1918.  Apart from a brief spell with 220 squadron (14.10.18 – 19.10.18) he remained with 222 squadron until December 23, 1918.

222 Squadron RAF 1918:

The squadron was formally formed at Thasos on 1 April 1918 from “A” Squadron of the former No. 2 Wing, RNAS when the Royal Air Force was formed. At this time, Richard Peirse became Officer Commanding 222 Squadron. Later, on 6 April 1918, former “Z” Squadron of No. 2 Wing, RNAS was added to the strength. Renumbered No. 62 Wing and consisting of Nos. 478, 479 and 480 Flights, the squadron was given the task of maintaining raids on Turkish targets in Macedonia and Thrace, operating from islands in the Northern Aegean, officially adopting the 222 Squadron number plate on 14 September 1918. The squadron continued to carry out raids on Turkish targets in the Balkans until the end of the war, eventually disbanding on 27 February 1919.

On 9 June 1918, following a raid to Kukli Burgas, the D.H.4 aircraft piloted by Lt. Colt, force landed into the sea and both men were picked up by Greek fishermen.

On 27th August 1918, again in a D.H.4 aircraft, this time piloted by Lieutenant Haughton, he bombed the seaplane base at Constantinople. Having successfully put a bomb in each of the three hangers, Maund climbed out of the aircraft to ascertain direct hits which earned him the nickname “Mad Monty Maund”.

AirCo DH.4 Light Bomber

Maund, continued operations until a brief posting to the Eastern Mediterranean Repair Base on September 18, 1918; joining 222 squadron September 22, 1918 and continuing to fly operations.

Posted to the Reserve Training Wing (F) on Christmas Day 1918; Reserve Training Wing, 10 Group February 11, 1919 and the Dispersal Centre, Crystal Palace, November 14, 1919.

On his return to civilian life Maund drove a milk lorry from Devonshire to London during the General Strike of 1926, and shortly after his marriage left for America where his first employment was as a chauffeur to the minister at the famous “Little Church around the Corner” in New York City. Later he rented space in a workshop for car repair and maintenance where some of his clients were prohibition mobsters. Following the Wall Street crash, Maund returned to the U.K. in 1930 and set up a garage in Goodmayes, Essex.

War Service (1939 – 1945).

WWII resulted in him losing his business and in 1944 he was recruited as a transport officer in the R.N.V.R. which included organising the transportation of the Mulberry Harbour, in preparation for the D-Day invasion.

Navy Lists:

Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve; Temporary Sub-Lieutenants (E): Ernest George Maund, 3 April 1944

After being demobilised he joined the Control Commission in Germany where he was responsible for transport in Northern Germany and was billeted in the Krupp’s private mansion. Latterly, until his retirement, Maund worked as a specialist engineer in the Woolwich Arsenal, concentrating mainly on naval guns and advanced experimental torpedoes.

Ernest George Maund D.F.M.,died on 23 November 1988.

The following extract is taken from ‘An Aviator in War and Peace’. Being biographical details of JOHN ARTHUR “Jack” Yonge (T67).

No 2 Wing, known as the Aegean Group, flew land planes from aerodromes situated on various small islands in the Aegean Sea off the Turkish, Bulgarian and the Greek coasts. This often involved flying for long distances over the sea and rugged enemy held territory in Thrace and Macedonia, bombing strategic targets in the eastern Mediterranean. The problems of flying in this area were compounded by heat and dust which often meant overheated and clogged engines.

Although no specific reference to Jack can be found he was almost certainly involved in the air attacks on the Goeben and Breslaw in January 1918. The records do refer to a number of pilots by name but the references seem to be to the bomber planes and not the escorting fighters.

These were the first ever aerial attacks on a capital ship. A number of pilots involved in the attacks were awarded the DFC but these were all awarded to the bomber pilots who had the more dangerous task

Some seventeen tons of bombs were dropped in and around the Goeben. One report said a bomb had d gone down the ships funnel but the individual bombs at the time were too small to sink here.

In January 1918 the Goeben having made a foray out into the Mediterranean hit a mine and was continually harried by RNAS machines from nearby Imbros and Mudros which were only about five miles away which flew attack after attack. Both bombing runs and straffing with machine guns. Reports say that within ten minutes of being sited there were up to ten British machines harrying the ships.

The minefield was clearly visible but one pilot reported that in order to avoid the bombs the Goeben and her sister ship the Breslaw started to zig zag violently and as a result hit a mine or in Breslaw’s case four or five which sank her.

Though going ever slower the Goeben in rounding Niagara Point ran aground, a perfect target for the RNAS.

For six days she was under attack by RNAS planes from Mudros and Imbros and even some RFC planes from Palestine. They were also joined by seaplanes from the Ark Royal and empress..

There was a real mix of aircraft involved with Camels as fighters and Strutters, DH4’s dH9’s BE2’s and Farnhams as bombers. In all 270 sorties were flown with attacks every hour in daylight hours and every two hours at night. In the first day the 20th of January 62 flights were launched It was one of the largest and most intensive aerial engagements of the war.

There were some hits (possibly up to 16) but also many misses for with heavy anti aircraft fire the bombers were forced to fly high.

German fighters were also present though most British losses were caused by anti aircraft fire from the Goeben and neighbouring German Seaplane station.

Captain Graham Donald who was in charge of the Camels at Imbros, wrote.

The air was stiff with German fighters. They were attacking our bombers and several got shot down. It was one long confused melee dogfight. The one thing that mattered was the Goeben. All the RNAS planes in the Aegean were attacking her, quite a lot of RFC planes from Palestine – fully 70- aircraft.

Captain Marlowe, wrote on 5th January 1918

After one of my trips, when we sank a small vessel lying alongside the warship [The German ship the Goeben] and also got a hit on the ship itself, I was ordered to fly to Mudros. Yonge in a Camel was supposed to escort me but he had engine trouble so I went alone.

Donald wrote again, giving a flavour of the action.

I reckon we shot down about six German fighters (Albatrosses D IV’s and Halberstadts). On one occasion I saw a small Halberstadt fighter climbing at an unbelievably steep angle to attack Ralph Sorety and Smithy in their DH4. He was right below me so I put my Camel into a vertical dive and practically fell on top of him with both Vickers going. He went down in a queer sort of tumbling spin but nobody saw him crash. You can’t leave escorted bombers to go down and confirm kills.

By the 28th of January the Goeben had fled, It made it to Constantinople but was effectively out of action for the rest of the war.

The shared problems of flying in this area led to an unusual camaraderie between the British and German pilots,

From 1915, the RNAS formed numbered wings, which controlled their own lettered squadrons. No. 2 Wing RNAS, with its subordinate squadrons, was assigned to the Aegean area.

One of the squadrons was ‘C’ Squadron, comprising Nos. 475, 476 and 477 Flights. DH.4s were, in time, joined by DH.9s and Sopwith Camels. On the formation of the RAF, on 1 April 1918, the Wing was integrated as No. 62 Wing RAF. The flights kept their numbers, rather than the customary letters, as each Flight operated a different aircraft type and the squadron formed a self-contained bomber, or reconnaissance, force with its own integral fighter cover. No. 475 Flight flew DH.4 day-bombers, No. 476 Flight flew DH.9 day-bombers and the fighter-flight, No. 477 Flight, flew Sopwith Camels. It seems that Jack was in C flight as he flew Camels.

What later became 222 Squadron Squadron was formally formed at Thasos on 1 April 1918 from “A” Squadron of the former No. 2 Wing, RNAS when the Royal Air Force was formed. Later, on 6 April 1918, former “Z” Squadron of No. 2 Wing, RNAS was added to the strength. Renumbered No. 62 Wing and consisting of Nos. 478, 479 and 480 Flights, the squadron was given the task of maintaining raids on Turkish targets in Macedonia and Thrace, operating from islands in the Northern Aegean, 

What was to become 220 Squadron was based on the island of Imbros and 222 Squadron at Thasos.

It seems that John was at first with what became 220 Squadron (Reconnaissance Squadron Aegean/C Squadron) which operated Camels before moving to what became 222 Squadron (number 1 Fighter Squadron Aegean/A Squadron) which had three flights each of up to six machines and two reconnaissance flights 478 and 479 and one fighter wing which Jack would have flown in. In his advertisement book for the flying school that he later ran in America he says that he was in charge of a a Flight of planes.

220 Squadron and 222 squadron were not formally designated as such until the 9th September 1918. Both were disbanded in February 1919.

That was the plan but it seems that what happened on the ground was rather different in A and B were merged into F Squadron at Mudros which became the precursor of 222

What was to become 222 Squadron was made up of three flights of six planes each, 478 and 479 were reconnaissance flights and 489, Jacks flight, which was a fighter unit. The Squadron was constantly on the move. The details are:

1st April 1918 to Thasos

6th May 1818 to Stravos

6th May 1918 to Thasos

13th May 1918 to Marian

14th May 1918 to Thasos

22nd May 1918 to Mudros

6th July 1918 to Imbros

7th July 1918 to Mudros

15th Nov 1918 to San Stephano, Corfu

23rd Nov 1918 to Mudros

222 initially had some DH4’s on strength, followed by some DH9’s in June 1918 as well as Camels and Sopwith Strutters.

A Captain A.F. Marlowe kept a diary “The War Diary of a Naval airman” of his period in the Aegean, reporting on the activities of the unit, enemy activity, raids by the Group and the frequent engine failures. He makes a number of references to John Yonge.

18th April 1918

A lot of enemy activity locally and I took Wright to bomb Angista Junction (Yonge and Lister escorting). The guns over there are too good to stay around there very long – big stuff and very close, crashes all around us …..The Camels were well out of all this, high up above, but I was very glad to see them come down and join us , just after I had spotted two Albatross scouts closing in on us. I got my guns going and Wright was firing his in the back and as the Camels came in to join in the two enemy machines sheared off, and after a few minutes manoeuvring for position, the Camels sticking close by, they dived away and disappeared They could out climb us easily.

30th May

A shark was seen whilst we were bathing – close in. Yonge tells us his grandfather was headmaster at Eton. [He was a master at Eton but not headmaster] There has been much artillery activity and reports say we have taken 1200 prisoners, 23 officers and some guns.

6th June

We now have 7 Camels (5 pilots) 5 DH4’s (3 pilots) and 2 Sopwith fighters (1 pilot).

8th June

The usual recce and spotting trips go on. Today there is perfect calm and everybody misjudges things and has to make at least two attempts at landing through over running. Yonge had to make 6 attempts and in the last one he smashed his machine in a ditch.

It is not known at which landing strip this occurred but conditions at the airstrips were not good. The field at Imbros nestled between a salt lake on one side and a harbour on the other and at one end there were hills which funnelled the wind in unexpected directions and made each landing and takeoff a unique experience, and sand dunes which blew across the field., clogging up engines. Thasos field was not much better. It was on a piece of land jutting out into the sea and was subject to downdrafts caused by the winds sweeping down from the nearby hills. At both fields there was just a bare earth surface which made it very difficult for the pilots to judge height. In England grass landing strips enabled pilots to judge height for when they could see the blades of grass, they knew they were nearly at the height to touch down.

24th June

Enemy aircraft have been making bombing attacks on our ships in the harbour at Stavros lately. The noise has been waling me up in the morning. Sometimes they fly over us and we dive for our holes in the sand. With all the gunfire going on and bits of metal falling out of the sky as shrapnel splinters come down, it can be very dangerous.

At a mess meeting it was decided to go on to bare rations until things get sorted out. Yonge has retired as mess secretary and there is rather a mix up. A raid on Drama is down for tomorrow, with the R.F.C.

8th August

‘A hostile Seaplane patrolling the mouth of the Straits, was pursued by two camels Captain J.A. Yonge and Second Lieutenant J. Lynch) which continued to engage until Nagara Seaplane Shed was reached. Tracers from both Camels had been seen to enter fuselage of enemy machine which did not move after landing. Our machines were subjected to intense machine gunfire when at a height of about 100 feet, but were only slightly damaged and were turning for home when two Halberstadt Scouts from behind Chanak dived on them. An engagement which lasted 15-20 minutes took place over the Narrows and Chanak at an altitude of 50 to 1200 feet. The enemy machines eventually drew off and the camels, subjected to severe A.A. and machine gun fire from the land, did not follow, as Captain Yonge had expended all his ammunition’

 5th September

Arrived here at Mudros at about 7 a.m. and reported to the drafting officer. Met Yonge and he is in trouble – a weeks disciplinary course after getting into Feeney’s bad books. He objected to flying and others being ordered to fly, on dark nights in Camels. Everyone supported him. However he eventually flew but not before writing a letter to the Wing Captain. Feenny was very ungentlemanly about it, but when he was going on leave and offered to shake hands, Yonge turned his back and walked away. Now all he wants is to be transferred to the Western Front..

10th September

Yonge asks me for dinner over in his mess. Things are much better now than when I stayed here before. Everything organised and under control. In the evenings we sit by the fig tree outside our mess hut and Scott plays his mandolin and we softly sing sentimental songs. ……… . It seems that Bowhill is to ask all pilots what they have been doing out here as he is thinking of sending in recommendations for decorations. Everyone is getting ready to shoot a good line of bull.

Conditions at the landing strips were not good and that is quite apart from the difficult landing and take off conditions. The Crew lived in tents, had earth latrines and were constantly surrounded by dust and insects. One pilot wrote if you were eating jam, you had to waive your hand over it all the way from your plate to your mouth, to make sure you were not eating flies. The only time to use the latrines as just before lunch. As soon as the gong sounded the flies left the latrines and went over to the mess tent.

He was automatically in the Royal Air Force, when it took over the R.N.A.S and the R.F.C. from its establishment on April 1st 1918. He held from 1st April1918, the wartime rank of rank of Captain. A title which he used when promoting his flying school in Indiana in the early 1920’s.

The Confidential Report on his service in the Aegean states “VG officer and pilot”

Number 222 Squadron came back to England to be disbanded on the 27th February 1919. His medical record shows that he had four weeks leave granted in July 1919 following fracturing his left fibula. It is not known whether this was the result of a flying accident. In August he was assessed as category A and told to report forthwith to his unit. On the 22nd of August 1919 he was discharged.

In September 1919 he appears on the Air Force Register as unemployed. By June 1920 he was off the register.

Navy Lists

Name: Maund E.G.; Where Serving: [Sanderling]; Rank: S L (E); Seniority: 3.4.44

Name: Maund E.G. Where Serving: [Raven] Rank: S L (E) Seniority: 3.4.44

Base: Sanderling:

Rank: Temp. Sub- Lieut.(E), R.N.V.R.; Name: E.G. Maund; Appointment Date: 22 Apr 44

Base: Raven:

Rank: Temp. Sub- Lieut.(E), R.N.V.R.; Name: E.G. Maund; Appointment Date: December 44